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Self-diagnostic ICTELT Matrix

Page history last edited by Hazel Owen 7 years ago


Self-diagnostic matrix: ICTELT curricula design criteria

 

Developed in July 2009, the ICTELT diagnostic matrix (http://docs.google.com/View?id=dcqj5jv4_127gp4tzrgh) was seen as a 'behind the scenes' analysis of a continuum of possible ICTELT skills. It was intended to inform the design of a user-friendly, self-diagnostic survey with automatic feedback, links to tools, and suggestions for resources and professional development, that practitioners could use to identify realistic, incremental progression in the design and facilitation of ICTELT.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Criterion
Pre-Initial Initial
Emerging
Developed
Highly Developed
Design
  • Lessons/tutorials designed for student access to local people & resources
  • Lessons/tutorials designed for local (as opposed to global) collaboration
  • Resources/course designed with no alternative formats (e.g. audio/video as well as text)
  • Resources/course designed with no opportunities for student negotiation or generation of learning contexts
  • No alternatives to access course specific materials/resources/guidelines except in face-to-face sessions
  • No alternatives for interaction & communication except through face-to-face
  • No recognition of different levels of student ICT literacy & use of ICT
  • Lessons/tutorials designed mainly for student access to local people and resources with a few hyperlinks to global resources
  • Lessons/tutorials designed for local (as opposed to global) collaboration
  • Resources/course designed with some use of various formats (e.g. audio/video)
  • Resources/course designed with no opportunities for student negotiation or generation of learning contexts
  • Some materials/resources/guidelines  accessible online
  • No alternatives for interaction & communication except through face-to-face or email
  • No recognition of different levels of student ICT literacy & use of ICT
  • Lessons/tutorial/ course designed with occasional opportunities for local & global access (people & resources)
  • Lessons/tutorial/ course designed with occasional opportunities for local & global collaboration
  • Resources/course designed with occasional alternative formats (e.g. some texts also have an audio version)
  • Resources/course designed with occasional opportunities for students to negotiate and/or their learning contexts
  • One other alternative to access course specific expectations / materials/resources/guidelines e.g. online via a wireless laptop
  • Occasional alternatives for synchronous & asynchronous interaction & communication (for example, instant messaging & discussion boards)
  • Some level of student ICT literacy & use of ICT recognised (scaffolding & support integrated into the course)
  • Lessons/tutorial/ course designed with opportunities & support for local & global access (people & resources)
  • Lessons/tutorial/ course designed with opportunities for local & global collaboration
  • Resources/course designed with at least one alternative format (e.g. texts also have an audio version)
  • Resources/course designed with opportunities for students to negotiate and/or generate their learning contexts
  • One other alternative to access course specific expectations / materials/resources/guidelines e.g. online via a wireless laptop
  • Alternatives for synchronous & asynchronous interaction & communication (for example, instant messaging, wikis, & discussion boards)
  • Most levels of student ICT literacy & use of ICT recognised (scaffolding & support integrated into the course)
  • Lessons/tutorial/ course designed with fully integrated opportunities & support for local & global access (people & resources)
  • Lessons/tutorial/ course designed with fully integrated opportunities & support for local & global collaboration
  • Resources/course designed with a range of alternative formats to suit a variety of learning preferences & needs (e.g. audio/video as well as text)
  • Resources/course designed with opportunities for students to negotiate and generate their learning contexts
  • Unrestricted access to course specific expectations/ materials/resources/guidelines including via wireless laptop & mobile phone
  • Several alternatives for synchronous & asynchronous interaction & communication fully integrated into the course (for example, webinars, text messaging, instant messaging, virtual worlds, & discussion boards)
  • All levels of student ICT literacy & use of ICT recognised (scaffolding & support integrated into the course)
Facilitation
  • Sessions mainly transmission format; lectures
  • No provision made for recording & considering student 'voices'
  • Communities of Learning occur, but with no direct encouragement from the lecturer
  • The lecturer is unsure of the names, background, learning preferences etc of most of their students
  • Communication with the lecturer is in face-to-face sessions
  • No formal provision has been made to encourage alternative forms of communication between peers
  • Facilitation occurs with little attention to students' engagement in their learning

  • Students expected to make meaning from the information provided

  • Students are not, or only implicitly, aware of learning meta-skills
  • Few examples, provided (mainly text-based case-studies)


 

  • Sessions mainly transmission format, lectures but with some student-led face-to-face tutorials
  • Some provision for recording & considering student 'voices'
  • Communities of Learning occur, but with little direct encouragement from the lecturer
  • The lecturer knows the names of all of their students
  • Communication with the lecturer is in face-to-face sessions & via email
  • Some provision has been made to encourage alternative forms of formal communication between peers (e.g. discussion boards)
  • Facilitation occurs with little attention to students' engagement in their learning

  • Students expected to make meaning from the information provided

  • Meta-skills are 'taught' often through student support centres; little or no integration with course content/tasks
  • Some examples of
    modelling & scaffolding provided (occasional use of alternative media)
  • Sessions have some elements of transmission format, but with inclusion of student-centered activities, & student-led tutorials
  • Some provision for recording & considering student 'voices'
  • Communities of Learning occur & are their formation is encouraged by the lecturer
  • The lecturer knows the names, background, learning preferences etc of most of their students
  • Some flexible opportunities for formal & informal communication (e.g. discussion boards, 'virtual' online tutorial sessions & email)
  • Students encouraged to make their own meaning through active engagement in tasks
  • Student awareness of meta-skills raised through formal activities at relevant points in a course
  • Frequent examples of
    modelling & scaffolding provided (with judicious use of multi-media)
  • Sessions have a small element of transmission format, but with frequent opportunities for student-centered, enquiry-based tasks/activities, & student-led sessions
  • Role of the lecturer mainly that of facilitator & designer
  • Student 'voices' welcomed and valued
  • Communities of Learning occur & are nurtured by the lecturer
  • The lecturer knows their students well enough to put in place elements that lead to an environment of rapport & trust
  • Flexible opportunities for formal & informal communication (e.g. 'virtual' online office hours/tutorial sessions, & texting)
  • Students scaffolded to make their own meaning through active engagement in authentic tasks
  • Student awareness of meta-skills introduced at relevant points in a course, guided & encouraged
  • Some opportunities  for / examples of
    modelling & scaffolding provided (frequent use of multi-media, in a range of contexts)
  • Role of the lecturer shifted to facilitator, mentor and designer
  • Student-led sessions (virutal & physical) frequent
  • Student 'voices' encouraged & heard
  • Formation of a Community of Learning (virtual & physical) actively encouraged
  • Rapport & trust fostered to cultivate an environment for scaffolded 'risk taking'
  • Frequent, flexible opportunities for formal & informal communication (e.g. 'Virtual' online office hours, instant messaging, 'virtual' tutorial sessions, & texting)
  • Students supported/scaffolded to make their own meaning through active engagement in authentic tasks
  • Student awareness & discussion of meta-skills fully integrated, guided & encouraged (online & face-to-face)
  • Frequent opportunities  for / examples of
    modelling & scaffolding provided (in a variety of formats & contexts)
Assessment
  • Formative assessment is rare & feedback is not discussed
  • No peer assessment is included in the course
  • Feedback to assessments is provided by the teacher
  • Previous assessments are made available online
  • Assessments take the form of essays or short-answer/multiple choice questions
  • Assessment tasks are the same as those given in previous years
  • Assessment is aligned with Learning Outcomes
  • Students have limited opportunities for formative assessment by the teacher
  • Students are encouraged to discuss formative assessment feedback
  • Peer assessment is rare
  • Feedback to assessments is provided by the teacher
  • Previous assessments and rubrics are made available online
  • Assessments tend to take the form of essays, presentations, or quizzes
  • Assessment tasks are often based on those given in previous years
  • Assessment is integrated with Learning Outcomes & facilitation
  • Students have some opportunities to discuss formative assessment feedback
  • A few opportunities for peer assessment
  • Timely feedback, mainly from the teacher
  • Students discuss the learning outcomes / assessment rubrics (which are made available online)
  • Assessments make some use of alternative practices & approaches
  • Assessment tasks are challenging
  • Achievement is rewarded
  • Assessment is well integrated with Learning Outcomes & facilitation
  • Students have frequent opportunities to reflect on & discuss formative assessment feedback
  • Some opportunities for meaningful, peer assessment
  • Timely feedback, from a range of sources  (e.g. industry experts in NZ)
  • Assessment context-flexible (e.g. students do not, necessarily, have to be on site to complete assessments)
  • Assessments applied
  • Students discuss the learning outcomes they wish to achieve
  • Assessments make use of innovative, engaging practices & approaches
  • Assessment tasks are challenging (but are scaffolded)
  • Achievement is recognised & shared
  • Assessment is fully-integrated, relevant & assesses what has been included in the course
  • Timely, formative assessment an essential part of a course
  • Frequent opportunities for meaningful, peer assessment
  • Multiple sources of feedback (e.g. 'outside', global experts)
  • Assessment context-relevant (e.g. where students practice their learning)
  • Assessments authentic & applied
  • Students negotiate the learning outcomes they wish to achieve
  • Assessments make use of innovative, engaging practices & approaches
  • Assessment tasks are challenging (but have sufficient scaffolding to support learners)
  • Achievement is shared & celebrated
Evaluation
  • Formal evaluation of the course/programme/lecturer etc, conducted by the institution
  •  Evaluation conducted once a semester by the practitioner
    which results in occasional changes to teaching practice or course content/activities/design
  • One method of evaluation for formal & informal feedback from students
  • Some reflective evaluation
    which results in changes to teaching practice and course content/activities/design
  • At least one method of evaluation for formal & informal feedback from students & colleagues
  • Some iterative & reflective evaluation
    (e.g. re-application of feedback for improvements and/or change)
  • More than one method of evaluation (formal & informal)
  • Involvement of colleagues & students (e.g. peer observations)
  • Iterative & reflective evaluation
    (e.g. timely, 'visible' re-application of feedback for improvements and/or change)
  • Multiple methods of evaluation (formal & informal)
  • Involvement of colleagues & students (e.g. peer observations)
 
Creative Commons License
ICT Enhanced Learning and Teaching Framework and Model by Hazel Owen, Diana Ayling, and Ed Flag is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 New Zealand License.

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